NAVIGATION

Castle Caldwell Forest Walks

Castle Caldwell Forest

Castle Caldwell Forest

Castle Caldwell Forest comprises a narrow wooded peninsula that stretches out into the northern waters of Lower Lough Erne. With dramatic views out across the lough towards the Magho Cliffs, and ancient woodland filled with red squirrels and an abundance of bird life there is plenty to see. Not to mention the ruins of Castle Caldwell itself which has numerous links to the geology and industry of the local area, most notably the famous Belleek Pottery down the road.

Click here to view the Castle Caldwell Walking Routes Map.

Castle Scenic Walk

Distance: 0.5km                                         Time: 20 minutes

Grade: Easy                                                 Terrain: All types, mostly forest track.

Route: Anti-clockwise circular                 Wheelchair Friendly: No

Facilities: car parking, picnic area.           Grid Reference: IH 014 604

Map: Discoverer Series OSNI Sheet 17 Lower Lough Erne; Activity Map OSNI Upper and Lower Lough Erne

Castle Caldwell Ruins

Castle Caldwell Ruins

The Castle Scenic Walk offers a gentle and appealing introduction to the Castle Caldwell estate. A series of forest tracks zigzag through this ancient woodland area where views are dominated by the Castle ruins. After Passing through a section of walled gardens, you will reach a gravel track leading to the foot of the icy clad ruins of the old castle. Although the castle was eventually abandoned in the 1900`s, if local ghost stories are to be believed, the ruins are still haunted by Dennis McCabe, a fiddler who drowned after falling off the Caldwell family barge.

Beech Wood Walk

Distance: 2km                                            Time: 45 minutes

Grade: Easy                                                 Terrain: All types, mostly forest track.

Route: Clockwise circular                           Wheelchair Friendly: No

Facilities: Car parking, picnic area.           Grid Reference: IH 014 604

Map: Discoverer Series OSNI Sheet 17 Lower Lough Erne; Activity Map OSNI Upper and Lower Lough Erne

Bluebells Castle Caldwell Forest

Bluebells Castle Caldwell Forest

The Beech Wood Walk encompasses both lakeshore and woodland paths. The first part of the walk is along the peninsula shore that would have been submerged by water up until the 1880`s when the lowering of Lower Lough Erne by approximately 3 metres exposed new land and new habitats developed. The path follows the new foreshore which is populated by alder and willow trees, whilst higher up on the banks oak and beech trees indicate the former water`s edge. Along the North facing stretch of the promontory, views over Lower Lough Erne towards Boa Island and Kesh can be enjoyed before the path drifts away into the forest. Here you may be able to catch a glimpse of some of the shy woodland mammals that inhabit this beautiful place such as the pine marten. The final stretch of the walk meanders through an area of broadleaf woodland, before opening up to reveal fine views of Castle Caldwell rising high above the forest floor.

Rossergole Point Walk

Distance: 4km                                            Time: 1 hour 20 minutes

Grade: Moderate                                        Terrain: All types, mostly forest track.

Route: Clockwise circular                           Wheelchair Friendly: No

Facilities: Car parking, picnic area.           Grid Reference: IH 014 604

Map: Discoverer Series OSNI Sheet 17 Lower Lough Erne; Activity Map OSNI Upper and Lower Lough Erne

Castle Caldwell Forest shoreline

Castle Caldwell Forest shoreline

Following the lakeshore through wonderful mixed woodland comprising of ash beech, oak, and holly, this popular path takes in the remnants of the estate’s castle, forts, defence walls, jetties, church and lime kiln. Walkers who take time to explore the area will find the industrial-scale lime kiln highlighting the importance of the local limestone, once frequently fired in the kiln to produce quicklime, and taken by barge to the nearby town of Belleek.

Another interesting feature which may be found at the eastern tip of the peninsula is the wall of the old strategic defence fort of Rossergole Point. This fortification no doubt played a vital role in protecting and controlling trade along this route. Today the old ruins offer walkers a vantage point for breathtaking views over Lower Lough Erne. Travelling onwards, the southern shore of the peninsula forms part of the Lower Lough Erne Nature Reserve, managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). The varied habitats within the forest and along this shoreline attract many types of birds from Red Breasted Mergansers and Kingfishers to Spotted Flycatchers. Continuing onward you will shortly join a forest track where its course carries you through attractive stands of ash trees and into denser forest before taking in the remnants of Castle Caldwell, a prominent feature within the woodland setting.